Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Rumours about new 5th injector housing

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    If you look physically at the DPF unit which houses both the catalyst and the filter, there is a pressure sensor over the DPF filter which supplies a analog voltage to the ecu.

    On a scantool (snap on, g-scan ect) there is 2 PID readings available for DPF pressure. One reading is stable, say .57 the other is a live reading which will fluctuate as engine rpm increases and decreases.

    I can only assume that the two equations mentioned above relate to these two PIDs.

    Comment


    • Spook1205
      Spook1205 commented
      Editing a comment
      There is only 1 pressure sensor which gets its value from reading pressure before and after the filter itself.

      A catalyst pressure reading is I think just a misinterpretation of terminology due to Torque Pro being a generic program. (This is just what I think and could well be incorrect myself)

    • JohnLynn
      JohnLynn commented
      Editing a comment
      The pids were worked out from Techstream so presumably Toyota find it useful to have a reading for both catalyst and the DPF differential pressure, so I don't think it is anything to do with torque pro as using this program is just a way for anyone to see the figures without having to resort to Techstream.
      Thanks for confirming that there is only one sensor, my brain cant understand how one sensor can measure a difference as surely it needs to read two places to be able to give a difference?

    • Spook1205
      Spook1205 commented
      Editing a comment
      Going through scantool data and found catalyst differential pressure it is reading 0.002 roughly after a forced regen to make sure catalyst will still get hot after coolant going through it. It did.

      How it gets the reading Is an engineer answer I think.

  • #17
    is this what you were looking for JohnLynn ?

    https://toyota-club.net/files/faq/15...engine_eng.htm

    the document has been updated by the author in the last few months
    2016 GX , in White

    Comment


    • JohnLynn
      JohnLynn commented
      Editing a comment
      Yes it is very helpful thanks, it shows the catalyst and the filter as two equal sized halves of the DPF I don't know if they physically are the same size or it is drawn like that for clarity. I am still trying to get my head around how both the catalyst and filter seem to have varying degrees of restriction.

    • White One
      White One commented
      Editing a comment
      I'm fairly sure , from seeing Facebook photos , the catalytic converter portion is shorter than the filter portion. I also think that the cat does not offer any restriction , like existing cat converters.

  • #18
    The cat is 90mm and the filter is 135mm
    Attached Files

    Comment


    • #19
      Here is a pic of 3 readings
      Attached Files

      Comment


      • #20
        I knew I could rely on this forum, my question on the Prado forum has not had a response.
        Anyway thanks for the photos, I now know what a filter and a catalyst look like! the readings in the last post still make my head hurt, I can see that the restriction through the catalyst is tiny compared with the filter but don't understand what the "corr" reading is. Could this mean corrected or something as the other reading is a minus which couldn't happen unless someone was blowing up the end of the exhaust pipe???
        Trying to think about the pressures logically they still seem very low to me, I haven't ever used Kpa I must admit, PSI makes so much more sense and the statement posted previously (if true) that manufacturers limit the back pressure to 10 Kpa or 1.5 psi seems far more likely than the fractions above.
        Please don't think I am trying to be a smart Alec, I simply don't understand what is going on here and am trying to find out.
        To give you an idea of the machinery I am used to, today I am machining the valve seats in a 3.8 diesel cylinder head having fitted new guides, this doesn't even have a seat insert, the shape is literally just machined into the cast head. No catalyst or dpf or anything much else to worry about.

        Edit: I had to repost this as the forum censored my previous one as I had not written smart Alec but something else

        Comment


        • Spook1205
          Spook1205 commented
          Editing a comment
          At idle on a clean DPF there is basically no difference in pressure from the front of the filter to the back.

        • JohnLynn
          JohnLynn commented
          Editing a comment
          Was your test from the photo above taken at idle with a clean dpf? as if so it would fit nicely with this statement from #15 "Depending on the DPF wall material, cell density, diameter and brick length, a clean DPF typically has a baseline pressure drop of 0.5-0.8 kPa"
          What I am trying to get at is why Cuda in #12 posted " I managed to find out the PID for the Cat diff sensor so I now monitor that it reduces to 0.05 after a burn is finished. I think this is the only true way to see if the DPF is starting to block up."
          As I still cant see how the tiny pressure difference across the catalyst is an indication of the dpf blocking?

        • Spook1205
          Spook1205 commented
          Editing a comment
          Yes that photo is straight after a forced regen.
          If the catalyst number goes to $h\? when the DPF filter blocks up its viable to monitor. Cuda should be able to shed some light on that.

      • #21
        Anyone seen or heard of the latest Toyota Buliton “DPF Level Up Parts”. Just had my 54 month service and when they checked the DPF they say there was smoke and accumulatetion sitting high.
        Toyota replacing DPF and the new 5th injector and latest software. I could notice that the DPF regens every 250km where taking longer, and fuel consumption increased a little bit over last 18 months.
        Toyota doing the fan bearing too which sometimes makes a faint noise.
        Even though it’s expensive to get serviced at Toyota, they seem to be doing everything they can when “out of warranty”.

        Comment


        • #22
          They have to replace those parts out of warranty , they have EPA obilgations regarding pollution levels , which are breeched each time they get a smoky one
          2016 GX , in White

          Comment


          • Frazza
            Frazza commented
            Editing a comment
            What if it happens in 5 years time, would Toyota have to replace parts for free?

          • White One
            White One commented
            Editing a comment
            cant say Frazza , there are companies out there that can clean the DPFs , like what happens in Europe now. so that might be an option.

          • Frazza
            Frazza commented
            Editing a comment
            How long do you think Toyota “have to replace those parts” for free when the car is out of warranty to meet EPA?

        • #23
          So far so good. DPF cat value goes up and then drops down post burn. I will continue to monitor.

          Comment


          • #24
            Frazza, is that the actual title of the TSB, is there a number associated with it? My dealer in Vic had no idea there were redesigned parts available. and said there was no TSB when they searched. I'd be keen to know if there is a TSB for this...

            Comment


            • Frazza
              Frazza commented
              Editing a comment
              Hi Bussa, not exactly sure of the bullion number or the exact title. The service Guy is going to ring me when the parts in. On my 54 month service invoice it says “DPF LEVEL UP PARTS” + “BLOWER FAN”. The service Guy said it’s very recent, not sure but I’m thinking in the last 2 weeks. I was surprised at how proactive they are to make sure car is as good as it can be, especially hearing others having to limp in to Toyota or record data, going back & forth. I will let you know what it says on the paperwork when the work is done.

          • #25
            My new dpf housing looks different again. I suspect the numbers represent mould number and manufacture batch number

            Click image for larger version

Name:	20200523_142843.jpg
Views:	92
Size:	339.3 KB
ID:	20507Click image for larger version

Name:	20200523_142843.jpg
Views:	64
Size:	339.3 KB
ID:	20508

            Comment

            Working...
            X