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  • Bypassing the DPF.

    After our recent Engine Failure that turned out to be due to human error, we had the chance to pull out the 1GDFTV and studied it really hard. At our shop we thought about the good things about the DPF and listed the all the bad things about it. We summized that there were about 50+ things bad about it and can't find anything good about it. It is an emission burden that those european idiots thought about and we had to follow it without any questions.

    This lead us to think about going around it. What if we can do something around it? Of course we can. But it has to look stock and pretty much pass visual inspections. It won't pass proper e-safety emissions check but there is a way around it.

    Currently we have 3D scanned our old DPF and finalized the design of our De-biscuited DPF pipe. It will look like a real DPF but just empty inside. It will probably cost us around $350 Maximum. I had a chat with the possible overseas manufacturer and they are happy to do an initial batch of 15 pieces at the cost of $300 each.

    To install the system, we have to purchase a DPF Delete Emulator from 54 4x4 accessories for $450. I had a chat with the owner and they said we can install the emulator under 20 minutes. All the emulator does is just trick the ECU into thinking that the DPF Pressures are nice and dandy. After installing the emulator, we can proceed to install our own De-biscuited DPF. NO MORE DPF REGENERATION ANXIETY!

    When our cars get older it'll need the e-safety check, we can just remove the emulator, install the old DPF and take it for inspection! DONE. After you passed the safety check, re-install the emulator and the de-biscuited DPF. Same thing if you want to sell your vehicle in the future, just remove the hack and it'll go back to its DPF choked, underpowered self.

    When everything is finalized I will post a notice on this thread and see if anybody is interested in this hack.
    Last edited by cheekydonkey; 14-10-2017, 02:53 PM.

  • #2
    $450 for an emulator cost can be brought down by feeding .8v through a voltage divider off the 5 volt power supply to the sensor. This will give the ecu the signal voltage as if it has just done a burn and DPF is clean.
    i would have to check current flow of the sensor then can work out resistor values for voltage divider. It would be something that can be hidden in wiring harness and would be cheap to purchase bits needed.
    Not sure if ECU will still want to do burn offs at given intervals or if it's only looking for increase in sensor values.
    What you are working on will be a great work around when they start failing.
    If looks standard shouldn't have an issue with e- safety check as emissions are not tested (NSW).
    I have 90k on mine now with no problems yet.

    Comment


    • #3
      After reading another post it appears that DPF will only burn off on sensor values.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm going to be interested in doing something like this once my warranty runs out next year.

        No affiliation but this company has something for the 2.8l hilux so was wondering whether it'd suit the Fortuner?

        https://chiptuning.com.au/dpf-removal-service/

        Comment


        • cheekydonkey
          cheekydonkey commented
          Editing a comment
          The boys at chiptuning Sydney let me drive a 2.8 Hilux with EGR, DPF delete with a stage 1 tune. Man, it was like on a power mode x3. There is a massive difference between our DPF choked 2.8 and their hacked 2.8. But they had to change the ECU Maps, disable a few codes for the EGR and DPF. They will also lock the ECU with a password, so you can't really put the car back to stock if you plan to sell it in the future. They asked $2200 for it, drive-in drive-out. I was tempted but thought about the long term plans for the car. We have sold all our vehicles past 500,000 kms and it would be silly to sell a hacked Toyota in the future. So this mod was out of the question.

      • #5
        My warranty runs out in 10k kms so very interested what's on the market.
        Been lucky with the warranty cause I have had two bullbars needed to be done due to rust. Toyota have just given them to me to put on myself seeing I fitted the original from new.
        I think the DPF will have to go once it plays up, EGR really doesn't rob engine of power due to it doesn't open under load and exhaust gas only replace the excess air a diesel sucks in that is not used.
        if I can find a quality re-map I will go towards that, Baileys diesel do some amazing upgrades for the 3ltr so interested in what they come up with for the 2.8
        only downside to upping engine performance is the extras strain on engine and drivetrain.

        Comment


        • dandin
          dandin commented
          Editing a comment
          If you find someone who can do a tune/remap that doesn't cost 2k and doesn't lock the ECU with a password of some other propriety system I'll be interested to know too.

        • tuna tourer
          tuna tourer commented
          Editing a comment
          I'm waiting on baileys before i do anything to mine if there not selling it yet its not ready

        • Spook1205
          Spook1205 commented
          Editing a comment
          That’s a decent call Tuna, Baileys know their stuff. Matt took us through the whole injector rebuild from start to finish in the workshop last year. Impressive set up.

      • #6
        Originally posted by Spook1205 View Post
        $450 for an emulator cost can be brought down by feeding .8v through a voltage divider off the 5 volt power supply to the sensor. This will give the ecu the signal voltage as if it has just done a burn and DPF is clean.
        i would have to check current flow of the sensor then can work out resistor values for voltage divider. It would be something that can be hidden in wiring harness and would be cheap to purchase bits needed.
        Not sure if ECU will still want to do burn offs at given intervals or if it's only looking for increase in sensor values.
        What you are working on will be a great work around when they start failing.
        If looks standard shouldn't have an issue with e- safety check as emissions are not tested (NSW).
        I have 90k on mine now with no problems yet.
        Yeah, most delete pipes i've seen on the market and the internet are ugly pipes that look like a hard-on on a wedding day. Our empty DPF will have the pressure tubes, and ancillaries connected (but not working) just to keep the non-modified look. As soon as I get the first batch in 2 1/5 months, I will post it here and see if anybody is interested. Price will be $350 maximun, shipped to your door. With the disabling of the DPF and EGR, it's up to you. You can choose a company that you prefer, go to the Emulator pathway, maybe in the future Tactrix Openport can hack the Toyota ECU and we can do it on our own. The most important thing is that we can restore the vehicle to stock standard for future reselling purposes.

        Keep an eye on this thread if you are interested in the de-biscuited DPF. cheers!

        Comment


        • #7
          DPF Emulator and Test Pipe.
          I've just installed a DPF emulator and a test pipe that practically eliminates the DPF. Before I installed the kit I did a manual regeneration and cooled the car down. It took me 1 1/2 hour to remove the DPF and about half an hour to install the test pipe. The emulator took about half an hour to install. It's all running good at the moment. Contrary to most naysayers out there, there were no 1.) CELs 2.) No DPF lights. 3.) No limp mode 4.) No "See the dealer signs".

          So far I have done about 360 kms since installation and here are the positives that I found out.
          1. It feels like a potato has been taken off the tail pipe.
          2. EGTs are cooler.
          3. Fuel consumption has gone down.
          4. The engine is cooler.
          5 The car has improved its engine braking.
          6. The turbo spools quicker.
          7. There is more response.
          8. Definitely has more power.
          9. Gear change points have changed for the better.
          10. Engine is less laboured.
          11. It's breathing a lot better.
          12. You can hear the turbo now.
          13. You can hear a hint of the BOV working on overrun.
          14. The torque seems to be smoother and linear.
          15. It doesn't run out of breath past 3,000 rpm.
          16. Idle is smoother.
          17. No 5th injector noise.
          18. Engine is quieter.
          19. No more embarrassing smoke grenades at the lights.
          20. No more nauseating rubber smell post burn.
          21. No more "misfire" under load (more like the 5th injection).
          22. It doesn't seem to be stressed.
          23. No more regen anxiety.

          Negatives:
          1. For offroad/racing use only.
          2. Diesel soot now present in the tailpipe.
          3. The EPA will be clamping on this modification. Fck.

          Comment


          • #8
            Nice one Cheekydonkey👍
            You have certainly seen a big difference in the vehicle.
            How bad do you think the DPF was to make such an improvement or do you think even from a clean DPF such gains will be made.
            I have monitored the analog signal from DPF the last week and done over 500kms mostly highway driving and a bit around town. DPF still running around 1v at 100km p/h and no regen noticed.
            Toyota really could do with a petrol model for the guys that use their Fortuna that doesn't meet the fickle needs of a DPF.
            Please keep your experience posted, I love this stuff.

            Comment


            • cheekydonkey
              cheekydonkey commented
              Editing a comment
              the power increase is there but not by much. The most noteable change is the response from 900 rpm. I think the gains are around 7-10 kws but because the Factory Maps remain unchanged, it tends to be conservative in firing all the injectors. This is precisely where you want to be, maximising efficiency, driveability, reliability and overall response. I'm not really into crazy power because it'll only shorten the mechanical components' service life.

              However, some people have squeezed 170-180 kws from the 2.8, which is quiet impressive! This mod is for people who run big tyres and carry heavy load and equipment.

              Your research with the monitoring of the DPF signals is probably the most accurate way of determining the physical state of our DPFs, These signals are raw signals that the ECU relies on to determine the DPF regens. Maybe in the future you can use your data to create your own DPF emulator.

              Currently we are using a commercial DPF emulator and I will Private Message you the wiring diagrams as soon as we find out. One of the boys in the shop is a sparky and he said that material costs would have cost the seller $60 but they are selling it for $300-500.

              Our de-biscuited DPF canisters are very close to production and hopefully they can start the test batch. Once those bad boys arrive, we shouldn't be worried about the modified look anymore. Come trade-in time, or re-sell time, the car can be restored to stock configuration in no time.

          • #9
            Nice one👍
            You think the same as me when it comes to reliability and power trade off.
            I am working on the voltage divider/ emulator idea. Ran it by some of my Toyota student apprentices on Monday and they gave it the thumbs up. Tomorrow I will find out more information at work when I get to play around in my research development time.
            thanks again for sharing, I really appreciate it.

            Comment


            • #10
              wouldnt a regulated low voltage power supply , variable by a trimpot , be more stable than a voltage divider network ? with a divider if the reference voltage rises and falls then so would the output voltage vary.
              2016 GX , in White

              Comment


              • #11
                that is correct if reference voltage varied but my thoughts led me to the voltage divider idea due to 5v sensors are used because it's a very stable reference voltage.
                can you imagine the sh$t show it would cause to the fuel maps if your fuel pressure sensor or boost pressure (MAP) sensor reference voltage varied even a small amount.
                MAF sensors that run 5v reference put out an analog signal ones the use 14v as a reference (not stable) put out a frequency digital signal.
                whats important for the voltage divider idea is finding out the current flow. That is the key info on what size resistors I need. I'll endeavour to measure this tomorrow

                Comment


                • #12
                  thanks for clarifying , after i ready your reply i thought oh dur thats why power to all the sensors comes from the ECU. Everything on my old car was just fed from the IG+ lol
                  2016 GX , in White

                  Comment


                  • #13
                    Originally posted by cheekydonkey View Post

                    Yeah, most delete pipes i've seen on the market and the internet are ugly pipes that look like a hard-on on a wedding day. Our empty DPF will have the pressure tubes, and ancillaries connected (but not working) just to keep the non-modified look. As soon as I get the first batch in 2 1/5 months, I will post it here and see if anybody is interested. Price will be $350 maximun, shipped to your door. With the disabling of the DPF and EGR, it's up to you. You can choose a company that you prefer, go to the Emulator pathway, maybe in the future Tactrix Openport can hack the Toyota ECU and we can do it on our own. The most important thing is that we can restore the vehicle to stock standard for future reselling purposes.

                    Keep an eye on this thread if you are interested in the de-biscuited DPF. cheers!
                    hey Cheeky,

                    we we have a 2015 tuner that has 30,000km and is getting DPF replace by Toyota under warranty as has white smoke clouds every few days,

                    im definitely keen to buy your product to do the debiscuit mod

                    thank you

                    Comment


                    • #14
                      A have been recieving a few PMs on how to remove the DPF. It will take you 2-3 hours with basic tools. You will need a torx socket. A flex head wrench, and a few basic tools such as sockets and wrenches. IF YOU ARE NOT MECHANICALLY MINDED, hire a mechanic to do this.

                      1. Jack the front of the car so that you can disconnect the DPF from the exhaust pipe.
                      2. Lower the car.
                      3. Disconnect the battery.
                      4. Remove the plastic engine cover.
                      5. Remove the nut that is holding the 5th injector fuel line.
                      6. Remove the 5th injector banjo bolt. Prepare a piece of cloth, it will squirt a bit of diesel into your eye.
                      7. Remove the bracket that holds the Pressure sensors, and the egt sensors, (there are two brackets).
                      8. Remove 5th injector coolant lines there are two.
                      9. Remove the exhaust manifold heat shield.
                      10. remove the dpf heat shield.
                      11. remove the 5th injector assembly.
                      12. Remove the EGR pipe bolts.
                      13. Using the Torx Socket, remove the manifold bolts There are 8.
                      14. Remove the turbo bolts that hold the exhaust manifold.
                      15. Disconnect the O2 sensor. This will take you a few attempts. It's tricky!
                      16. Remove the 2 bolts that holds the DPF.
                      17. Remove the V-band clamp.
                      18. Shake the DPF loose.
                      19. Remove the DPF.
                      20. Celebrate with a cold beer for a job well done.

                      The exhaust system gets to about 700 degrees at times so expect a few nuts have welded itself to the bolts. This is where the TORX Socket comes in handy, just remove the whole bolt off from the head because you will need to give space to the DPF anyway. DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN THE EXHAUST BOLTS! The head is aluminum. If you have not dealt with turbo systems before, do not attempt this. I was just lucky on my younger years I was able to play with Big HP Supras.

                      That's it!
                      Last edited by cheekydonkey; 28-10-2017, 10:38 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #15
                        Nice one!
                        Did you weld a pipe down the middle or leave it hollow?

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